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Giving My Babies Wings to Fly

As mothers, we want our little ones to be happy, healthy, and safe. We want them to experience the best life has to offer without being exposed to the worst. We want them to experience the warmth of sunshine, without getting caught in any horrible storms. It’s understandable. They are our babies, and our main responsibility is to protect them.

Yet, we all know the truth. We know that we can’t protect them from everything. We know that they will experience failure and heartache, because those things are a part of life. Despite knowing this, however, we do our best to protect them for as long as we can. They need us and we are there—ready. That’s what moms do best.

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I speak to so many friends who are also moms, and the truth is we all worry. We all want to protect our little ones from pain. We all want to see our kids incredibly happy. Lately, I have been asking myself if my worry serves any purpose. Am I benefiting my children in any way by worrying about what might happen to them? I’m not. I’ve realized that worrying doesn’t serve my kids or me. It just causes undue stress in our lives.

And frankly, my kids don’t want a mom who is a worrywart. They want a mom that will let them explore life and what it has to offer. They want a mom that will encourage new experiences and be there for them when they fall. They want a mom who believes that they can reach the moon, because if their own mom doesn’t believe that—well, who will?

Moms can’t tell other moms how to raise their kids. We each have to figure that out on our own. But I think we can all agree on one thing: We don’t want to raise kids that are scared to pursue their dreams because they weren’t encouraged to fly high. The thought of it all scares me. I can admit that it does. But what scares me more is the thought of getting in their way.

I want my kids to dream big. I want them to know that courage is not the absence of fear, but the ability to pursue something even when a great deal of fear is present. I want them to know that I will try my best not to worry too much because doing so doesn’t really change much of anything. Instead, I will let them know the dangers that exist as well as the magic that awaits them, ultimately allowing them to decide the path they want to choose.

But before they reach an age where they are capable of making these types of decisions on their own, I will try my best to keep my worrying to a minimum and whenever I can, I will encourage them to spread their wings and fly. Sure, they might fall flat sometimes, but I have to remember that they just might soar.

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